subscribe to the newsletter

  • Серый Instagram Иконка
  • Серый Facebook Icon

109012, Moscow, Ilyinka St., 3/8, building 5    |    +7 (495) 162 0893     |     info@triumph.gallery     |     daily from 11.00 – 20.00     |     free entrance

FOOTBALL PRAYERS

Alex Folla

06.06.2018 – 01.07.2018

Triumph Gallery, Moscow

coordinator

Sofiya Kovaleva

Triumph Gallery presents another exhibition of the modern Italian artist Alex Folla, known for his  projects Miracles and #Unknownmonk, held in the Gallery in 2014 and 2015.

Alex Folla’s painting is rooted in the most archaic Italian tradition. This is a thoughtful, deeply intellectual and also defiantly technical painting, which refers him to the adherents of the direction planned by the masters of Trecento and Quattrocento, and in some aspects of Mannerism and the XVII century. In his series of works Football Prayers, first presented in St. Petersburg in 2014, and now supplemented by a new work, Alex refers to the subject of sports, especially, football. As Pierre Paolo Pasolini, one of the greatest Italian writers and filmmakers of the XX century, wrote:

"Football is the last sacred act of our time. At its core, it is both a ritual and escape from reality at the same time."

In his paintings, Alex folla went further, presenting his own reality combined with recognizable images and symbols of  the players around the world captured with a specific characteristic of their religious gestures: a Catholic crossing himself, a little different crossing of an Orthodox, a Muslim, etc. Football is becoming the new universal religion and the players are the heroes of the modern ritual, which replaces the mythology of the classical time. We return to the glorification of the figure of the hero, who has no other form of belonging and heroism, except his own body.

"The temple of this new religion, — says the artist, — is enclosed in the human body: without a perfectly trained body, providing impeccable physical form, it is impossible to Express talent, which is something intangible, it is impossible to evoke emotions and sensually involve the viewer in a kind of live communication."