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109012, Moscow, Ilyinka St., 3/8, building 5    |    +7 (495) 162 0893     |     info@triumph.gallery     |     daily from 11.00 – 20.00     |     free entrance

TERMITARIES

Dmitry Bulnygin

12.02.2016 – 17.03.2016

Central Exhibition Hall "Manege", Moscow

www.moscowmanege.ru

Termites are the first animals to have mastered the construction of "buildings" 200 million years ago. The biogenic structures of termitaries, made of sand and saliva parched by the sun, resemble the shapes of hills, mountains or chimneys. This world relies on agglomerated structures stronger than concrete.

 

Employing the medium of video associated with sculpture, the artist Dmitri Bulnygin refers to this type of housing, the termitary, to explore its organic forms as well as the universe of termites as a whole to further apply the principle of termite mounds to Moscow architecture. The artist brings in video sculptures of Termitaries amid the constructive and ornamental excesses of Moscow's eclectic architecture, using a selection of existing buildings constructed since the 1930s and up to the present day. The result is compact architecture, which resembles a pudding or a stalagmite at times.

 

The artist reinterprets the aesthetic language of housing, from the ornament of pompous academic styles to an improvised yurt between two chairs. The material of the cover serves as the medium to project the video of city lights on Termitaries. Here the picturesque landscape adjoins with temporary shelter.

 

The folds of cloth drape the structure, or what has to be hidden, for protection (either of the construction or ourselves) from unnecessary glances or frost. This cover belongs in the middle zone between what is hidden and what remains open, between the space of life and ruins. The folded shrinking termitaries convey the idea of the universal reduction. The change of scale creates an association with an empty or opening cocoon and fossil residues bearing an imprint of organic life.